World Intellectual Property Organization, WIPO

WIPO (World Intellectual Property Organization)

The World Intellectual Property Organization is referred to as WIPO. A specialized agency of the United Nations for the protection of intellectual property rights. Established in accordance with the Convention Establishing the World Intellectual Property Organization. The Convention was signed in Stockholm on July 14, 1967, and entered into force on April 26, 1970. China joined the organization on June 3, 1980. The organization is headquartered in Geneva.

On December 5, 2018, the World Intellectual Property Organization released the annual report of the "World Intellectual Property Index" (WIPI) in Geneva, saying that in 2017, China ranked the world ’s No. First, China's strong performance in the field of intellectual property has driven a record number of global intellectual property applications.

 

 International Organization Name   World Intellectual Property Organization
Abbreviations    WIPO
 Official Website     http://www.wipo.int



    World Intellectual Property Organization, WIPO Introduction

    The World Intellectual Property Organization is a UN agency dedicated to using intellectual property rights (patents, copyrights, trademarks, designs, etc.) as a means of stimulating innovation and creativity.

    The World Intellectual Property Organization, the World Trade Organization, and UNESCO are today the three most important international organizations governing intellectual property treaties (the latter two international organizations are not specialized intellectual property agencies).

    The World Intellectual Property Organization is headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, and has a liaison office in the United Nations Building in New York, USA.


    What is the Purpose of World Intellectual Property Organization, WIPO?

    The purposes of the World Intellectual Property Organization are:

     

        Promote the protection of intellectual property throughout the world through cooperation between countries and, if necessary, through collaboration with other international organizations;

        Ensure administrative cooperation between intellectual property unions. The organization manages a series of intellectual property treaties, including treaties such as the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works and the Convention for the Protection of Producers of Phonograms from Unauthorized Reproduction of Phonograms.

     

    What are the Functions of World Intellectual Property Organization, WIPO?

    The main function of the organization is to promote the protection of intellectual property throughout the world through cooperation between countries, manage the administrative work of 23 alliances on patents, trademarks and copyrights based on multilateral treaties, and handle intellectual property law and administration Matters.

    A large part of the organization’s financial resources are used for development cooperation with developing countries, to promote the transfer of technology from developed countries to developing countries, and to promote the invention and creative activities of developing countries in order to facilitate the development of science and technology, culture and economy.


    Development History of WIPO

    The roots of the World Intellectual Property Organization can be traced back to 1883 (Guwei year).

    In 1883, the Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property was born. This is the first important international treaty aimed at enabling the intellectual creation of a national to be protected in another country.

    The manifestations of these intellectual creations are industrial property rights, namely, industrial designs of trademarks for inventions (patents).

    The Paris Convention entered into force in 1884. At that time, there were 14 member states. The International Bureau was established to perform administrative tasks, such as holding member states meetings.

    In 1886, with the conclusion of the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works, copyright entered the international arena.

    The purpose of the Convention is to enable the rights of nationals of member states to be protected internationally, so as to control and receive remuneration for the use of their creative works.

    The forms of these creations are novels, short stories, poetry, drama, songs, operas, musical works, sonatas and paintings, oil paintings, sculptures, architectural works.

    Like the Paris Convention, the Berne Convention established the International Bureau to carry out administrative tasks.

    In 1893, the two small international bureaus merged to form an international organization called the Joint International Bureau for the Protection of Intellectual Property Rights (commonly known as BIRPI) This very small organization was based in Bern, Switzerland.

    At that time, there were only 7 staff members, which is today's World Intellectual Property Organization-this has 184 member countries and about 938 staff members from 95 countries around the world.

    The energetic entity of the ever-expanding mission and mission, the predecessor.

    As intellectual property rights become increasingly important, the structure and form of this organization has also changed.

    In 1960, BIRPI moved from Bern to Geneva in order to be closer to the United Nations and other international organizations in the city.

    On July 14, 1967, 51 members of the "International Union for the Protection of Industrial Property" (Paris Union) and the "International Union for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works" (Bernese Union) jointly established the World Intellectual Property Organization in Stockholm, Sweden, to further promote.

    The protection of intellectual property throughout the world strengthens cooperation between countries and intellectual property organizations.

    After 1970, the Convention establishing the World Intellectual Property Organization entered into force.

    Aafter undergoing institutional and administrative reforms and the establishment of a secretariat responsible to member countries, the Joint International Bureau for the Protection of Intellectual Property became the World Intellectual Property Organization.

    In 1974, the World Intellectual Property Organization became a specialized agency of the United Nations organizational system, shouldering the task of managing intellectual property affairs, which was recognized by United Nations Member States.

    In 1978, the WIPO Secretariat moved into the headquarters building.

    In 1996, the World Intellectual Property Organization signed a cooperation agreement with the World Trade Organization (WTO), thereby expanding its role in global trade management and further proving the importance of intellectual property rights.

    On July 23, 2009, the World Intellectual Property Organization headquarters launched the Access to Research for Developmentand Innovation (ARDI) program, which provides free development of low-level national government intellectual property departments and universities.

    Specific scientific and technical journals are used online with research institutions, and developing countries can use these journals at low prices.


    What is the Organizational Structure of World Intellectual Property Organization, WIPO?

    The World Intellectual Property Organization establishes 4 institutions:

    The General Assembly, the highest authority of the organization, is composed of the member states participating in the Paris Union and the Berne Union.

    The member states meeting is composed of all the member states of the WIOP Convention.

    The Coordination Committee is an institution established to coordinate cooperation between the various alliances.

    The International Bureau, which is the permanent office of the organization, has one director general and several deputy director generals.


    Decision-making body of World Intellectual Property Organization, WIPO

    All decisions regarding the strategic direction and activities of the World Intellectual Property Organization are made by member states.

    The Secretariat of the World Intellectual Property Organization is responsible for coordinating the formal and informal meetings held by the various institutions composed of member states.


    Leadership

    The following constituent organs established under the Convention Establishing the World Intellectual Property Organization are the highest decision-making bodies of the World Intellectual Property Organization.

    These institutions hold regular meetings in Geneva every September and October, and hold special meetings every other year.


    In addition: the treaties administered by the World Intellectual Property Organization have established the member states of the Union (such as the PCT Union Assembly, Madrid Union Assembly, etc.)


    Standing committee

    The Standing Committee is an ad hoc committee composed of experts.

    Standing committees are established by decisions adopted by the General Assembly for specific purposes, such as to determine whether new treaty provisions need to be formulated.

    • Patent Law Standing Committee (SCP)
    • Standing Committee on the Law of Trademarks, Industrial Designs and Geographical Indications (SCT)
    • Copyright and Related Rights Standing Committee (SCCR)
    • Information Technology Standing Committee (SCIT)

    If the Standing Committee believes that sufficient progress has been made towards the adoption of the treaty, the General Assembly may decide to convene a diplomatic conference.

    This is a high-level meeting of member states, which is held purely when the negotiations on the new treaty have entered the final stage and will be finalized.


    Other Committees

    Various international classification treaties (ie, the Locarno Agreement, Nice Agreement, Strasbourg Agreement, and Vienna Agreement) have established permanent expert committees with the task of regularly revising and updating the classification systems . Each leading body may establish a committee as necessary.


    Work Group

    A standing committee or other body may decide to establish a working group to conduct a more detailed review of a specific issue (such as an open-ended working group established by the eighth session of the Program and Budget Committee).

     

    What is the Main Mission of World Intellectual Property Organization, WIPO?

    Promote the protection of intellectual property rights in various countries of the world, and the legislation and procedures of intellectual property rights in various countries.

    Perform the administrative tasks of the Paris Union (including other alliances related to the Paris Union) and the Berne Union.

    Provide services for international applications for industrial property.

    Exchange of intellectual property information.

    Provide legal and technical assistance to developing countries and other countries.

    Facilitate the settlement of private intellectual property disputes.

    Use information technology and the Internet as tools for storing, querying, and using valuable intellectual property information.

    Can hold or participate in the administrative affairs of other international agreements that promote the protection of intellectual property rights.

    Logo and Seal of World Intellectual Property Organization, WIPO

    Encourage relevant countries to conclude international agreements that promote the protection of intellectual property rights.

    Collect and disseminate information on intellectual property protection, engage in and promote research in this area, and publish research results.


    What are the Strategic Objectives of World Intellectual Property Organization, WIPO?

    The nine strategic goals of the World Intellectual Property Organization are the first phase of a comprehensive strategic adjustment process within the organization by member states, which was adopted in December 2009:

    1. Develop an international normative framework in a balanced manner
    2. Bbecome the primary provider of global intellectual property services.
    3. Facilitate the use of intellectual property for sustainable development
    4. Coordinate and develop global intellectual property infrastructure
    5. Provide intellectual property information to the world And analysis reference source.
    6. International cooperation to establish a respect for intellectual property.
    7. To deal with intellectual property issues in accordance with global policy themes
    8. Establish a sensitive communication relationship between the World Intellectual Property Organization, its member states and all stakeholders.
    9. To establish effective and transparent administrative and financial Support structure for WIPO to complete its plans.


    Organization Convention

    The Convention Establishing the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO Convention) provides that members of the World Intellectual Property Organization are open to the following countries:

    1. Any country that is a member of the Paris Union for the Protection of Industrial Property or the Berne Union for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works.

    2. Any country that is a member of the United Nations, or a member of any United Nations specialized agency, or a member of the International Atomic Energy Agency, or a party to the statute of the International Court of Justice, and any member who becomes a member of the Organization at the invitation of the World Intellectual Property Organization country.

    Therefore, only countries can become members of the World Intellectual Property Organization.


    Organization Treaty

    The treaties adopted by the World Intellectual Property Organization fall into three categories.


    Protection Treaty

    (Intellectual Property Protection Treaties)

    1. The Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works, adopted in 1886.

    2. Brussels Convention Relating to the Distribution of Programme-Carrying Signals Transmitted by Satellite.

    3. To protect producers of recordings from unauthorized copying of their recordings Geneva Convention (Geneva Convention for the Protection of Producers of Phonograms Against Unauthorized Duplication of Their Phonograms).

    4. Madrid Agreement for the Repression of False or Deceptive Indications of Source on Goods, concluded in Madrid in 1891 and finally revised in Lisbon in 1958.

    5. Nairobi Treaty on the Protection of the Olympic Symbol.

    6. Patent Law Treaty.

    7. The Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property (abbreviated as "Paris Convention") was concluded in Paris in 1883 and was last revised in Stockholm in 1967.

    8. Rome Convention for the Protection of Performers, Producers of Phonograms and Broadcasting Organizations.

    9. Trademark Law Treaty (TLT), concluded in October 1994 in Geneva.

    10. WIPO Copyright Treaty (WCT), adopted on December 20, 1996.

    11. WIPO Performances and Phonograms Treaty (WPPT), adopted on December 20, 1996.


    What is the Protection System of World Intellectual Property Organization, WIPO?

    (Global Protection Sustem Treaties)

    1. Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT), concluded on June 19, 1970.

    2. Madrid Agreement Concerning the International Registration of Marks ("Madrid Agreement"), concluded in Madrid in 1891, last revised in Stockholm in 1967, and added a protocol in 1989.

    3. The Hague Agreement Concerning the International Deposit of Industrial Designs.

    4. The Budapest Treaty on the International Recognition of the Deposit of Microorganisms for the Purposes of Patent Procedure, which was internationally recognized for patent procedures, was concluded on April 28, 1977.

    5. Lisbon Agreement for the Protection of Appellations of Origin and Their International Registration.


    Classification Treaty

    1. Establish Locarno Agreement Establishing an International Classification for Industrial Designs.

    2. Nice Agreement Concerning the International Classification of Goods and Services for the Purposes of the Registration of Marks (referred to as "Nice Agreement"), concluded in Nice in 1957 and in 1977 Geneva last revised.

    3. Strasbourg Agreement Concerning the International Patent Classification.

    4. Vienna Agreement Establishing an International Classification of the Figurative Elements of Marks.

    In addition, the World Trade Organization's "Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights Agreement" was concluded in Malagas in April 1994. It is a major intellectual property treaty not under the administration of the World Intellectual Property Organization.


    Reward items

    By recognizing the achievements of inventors, creators, and innovative companies around the world, the WIPO rewards program is designed to help create a culture of innovation and creativity that is encouraged at all levels of society.

    The publicity effect of the WIPO Award also helps more people understand how the intellectual property system serves creativity and innovation.

    WIPO only considers nominations for national or international competitions and exhibitions. Applications for participating in award programs should be submitted through the State Intellectual Property Office and transferred to WIPO at least three months before the start of the event, with one award for each category and event.

    The selection process of the winners is the responsibility of the organizer and is conducted within the framework of the guidelines set by WIPO. The WIPO Award should be awarded as the highest award.


    World Intellectual Property Organization, WIPO Invention Award

    The WIPO Invention Award was established in 1979 to support the Organization ’s activities to promote invention and innovation around the world, and to enhance the image of inventors by recognizing their substantial contributions to national wealth and development.


    Creativity award

    The WIPO Creativity Award was established in 2001 to recognize creators of works protected by copyright and related rights, including creators and producers of works used in information technology, the Internet, and the virtual world.


    Innovation Enterprise Award

    The WIPO Innovative Enterprise Award was created to promote the use of the intellectual property system by companies and companies, and to raise public awareness about the benefits of the intellectual property system to businesses.


    Which are the Member States of World Intellectual Property Organization, WIPO?

    As of February 2020, the World Intellectual Property Organization has 192 member countries.

    Asian Member States

    Afghanistan, UAE, Oman, Azerbaijan, Pakistan, Bahrain, Bhutan, North Korea, East Timor, Philippines, Georgia, Kazakhstan, South Korea, Kyrgyzstan, Cambodia, Qatar, Kuwait, Laos, Lebanon, Maldives, Malaysia, Mongolia, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Nepal, Japan, Saudi Arabia, Sri Lanka, Tajikistan, Thailand, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Brunei, Uzbekistan, Singapore, Syria, Armenia, Yemen, Iraq, Iran, Israel, India, Indonesia, Jordan, Vietnam, China


    European Member States

    Albania, Ireland, Estonia, Andorra, Austria, Belarus, Bulgaria, Northern Macedonia, Belgium, Iceland, Poland, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Denmark, Germany, Russia, France, Vatican, Finland, Netherlands, Montenegro, Czech Republic, Croatia, Latvia, Lithuania, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Romania, Malta, Moldova, Monaco, Norway, Portugal, Sweden, Switzerland, Serbia, Cyprus, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Ukraine, Spain, Greece, Hungary, Italy, United Kingdom (United Kingdom)


    African Member States

    Algeria, Egypt, Ethiopia, Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Equatorial Guinea, Togo, Eritrea, Cape Verde, Gambia, Republic of Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Ghana, Gabon, Zimbabwe, Cameroon, Comoros, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Rwanda, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritius, Mauritania, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Niger, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Senegal, Seychelles, Sao Tome and Principe, Swaziland, Sudan, Somalia, Tanzania, Tunisia, Uganda, Zambia, Chad, Central African Republic


    Member States of North America

    Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Bahamas, Panama, Belize, Dominica, Dominica, Grenada, Costa Rica, Cuba, Haiti, Honduras, Canada, United States, Mexico, Nicaragua, El Salvador, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Trinidad and Tobago, Guatemala, Jamaica


    Member States of South America

    Argentina, Paraguay, Brazil, Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, Colombia, Guyana, Suriname, Venezuela, Uruguay, Chile


    Member States of Oceania

    Australia, Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Kiribati, Cook Islands, Marshall Islands, Niue, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, New Zealand


    Relations with China

    Overview

    China joined the organization on June 3, 1980, becoming its 90th member state.

    China joined the Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property in 1985, the Madrid Agreement for the International Registration of Trademarks in 1989, the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Art Works in October 1992, and the Patent Cooperation Treaty on January 1, 1994.

    As of January 1999, China had acceded to 12 treaties under the jurisdiction of the organization.

    On July 31, 2008, the World Intellectual Property Organization published the "World Patent Report" in Geneva in 2008, stating that the number of patent applications in the world reached 1.76 million in 2006, an increase of 4.9% over 2005.

    The increase in the number of patent applications in China, South Korea and the United States has contributed to the increase in the number of patent applications in the world.

    The report believes that the increase in the number of patent applications worldwide confirms the increasing internationalization of innovation activities. The report said that in 2006, Japan had 514,047 patent applications, 390,815 in the United States, 172,709 in South Korea, 130,806 in Germany, and 128,850 in China.

    Due to the significant increase in the number of patent applications filed in China, China's share of the world's total number of patent applications has greatly increased.

    From 2000 to 2006, China's share has increased from 1.8% to 7.3%. Between 2005 and 2006, the total number of patent applications filed by Chinese, Korean, and American applicants increased by 32.1%, 6.6%, and 6.7%, respectively.

    On July 10, 2014, the World Intellectual Property Organization set up a China office in Beijing. This is another landmark event in the field of intellectual property since China joined the World Intellectual Property Organization on June 4, 1980.

    After the United States, Japan, Singapore, and Brazil, the fifth foreign office established by the World Intellectual Property Organization.

    Chinese intellectual property protection legislation

    In addition, China's intellectual property protection legislation has also made considerable progress:

    1. "Patent Law of the People's Republic of China". The Patent Law of China came into effect on April 1, 1985. The patent system established in accordance with the law protects the patent rights of inventions and creations. Inventions include inventions, utility models and designs.

    2. "Trademark Law of the People's Republic of China". China's trademark law has been in effect since March 1983. Amended on February 22, 1993 to expand the scope of protection of trademarks, in addition to commodity trademarks, provisions for the registration and management of service marks were added; amendment procedures were added to formal examinations, and examination opinions were established during substantive examinations system.

    3. "Copyright Law of the People's Republic of China". China's Copyright Law shall come into force on June 1, 1991. The first amendment was made in October 2001, and the second amendment was made on February 26, 2010.

    4. Computer software protection regulations. On January 1, 2002, the Computer Software Protection Regulations were implemented.

    5. Protection system for new plant varieties. The Regulations on the Protection of New Varieties of Plants in China will come into effect on October 1, 1997.

    The "General Rules of the Civil Law of the People's Republic of China" stipulates six types of intellectual property rights, namely copyright, patent rights, trademark rights, discovery rights, invention rights and other scientific and technological achievements rights, and provides a civil law protection system for intellectual property rights.

    In the Criminal Law of the People's Republic of China, in Section VII, with eight articles, the relevant content of intellectual property crimes is determined, and thus the criminal law protection system for intellectual property rights in China is determined.

    In addition, separate laws and administrative regulations, such as the Patent Law of the People's Republic of China, the Trademark Law, the Copyright Law, and the Incentive Regulations for Inventions, have also stipulated relevant intellectual property rights.

    June 16, 1994 "White Paper on the Status of Intellectual Property Protection in China" was published

    The white paper is divided into three parts:

    1. China ’s basic positions and attitudes for protecting intellectual property rights.

    2. China has a high-level legal system for protecting intellectual property rights

    3. China has a complete law enforcement system for protecting intellectual property rights.

    The white paper says that the Chinese government's ability to abide by the sincere stance of international conventions and bilateral agreements on the protection of intellectual property rights and its ability to fully assume international obligations have won wide acclaim and support from international public opinion.

    China’s development and changes, ignoring basic facts, arrogantly comment on the current status of China ’s intellectual property protection. There is no need to argue about this argument. Facts are the best answer.

    On December 14, 2015, the "2015 World Intellectual Property Indicators" report was published, setting forth the latest developments in global intellectual property activities in 2014.

    The report points out that China ranks first in the world in the field of patents, trademarks, industrial designs and other intellectual property applications, and has become the main driving force for the development of intellectual property in the world.

    The report said that in 2014, global innovators submitted a total of about 2.7 million patent applications, an increase of 4.5% over 2013.

    In 2014, approximately 1.18 million patents were granted worldwide. Currently, there are approximately 10.2 million valid patents held globally, of which the United States accounts for 24.7%, Japan accounts for 18.8%, and China accounts for 11.7%.

    The Director General of the World Intellectual Property Organization, Francis Gurry, said at the press conference that "China's patent applications in the past few years have been extraordinary."

    According to the report, China had 922,200 patent applications in 2014, ranking first in the world, surpassing the combined rankings of the United States and Japan, which ranked second and third.

    Not only did the patent application department in China receive the most patent applications, but Chinese citizens and enterprises filed the most patent applications worldwide, with a total of 837,000.

    The report also said that the number of global trademark applications in 2014 increased by 6% over 2013. China also ranks first in the world in this field. In terms of industrial designs, although the number of Chinese applications decreased by 14.4% compared with 2013, it still ranks first in the world.

    According to the World Intellectual Property Organization report, China's innovation index ranking jumped to 14th in the world in 2019, making it the only developing country among the top 15.

    The R & D investment of the whole society has increased rapidly, reaching 1.9678 trillion yuan in 2018, accounting for 2.19% of GDP, ranking second in the world and exceeding the average level of the 15 most developed countries in the EU.

    The contingent of scientific and technological talents continues to grow, forming the world's most complete discipline system; large-scale scientific research equipment has reached 100,000 units (sets), more than 90% of which are open and shared with the whole society.


    Data Sharing

    On November 28, 2013, the World Intellectual Property Organization based in Geneva launched a database called WIPO GREEN in order to establish links between groups seeking to share innovative and environmentally friendly technologies to combat climate change.

    The database provides a wide range of green technology products, services, and intellectual property assets, and allows individuals and businesses to list and publicize green technology needs.

    Its technology comes from many institutions such as small and medium-sized enterprises, multinational companies, innovators and global universities. The database can be queried for free, and there are currently 35 partners.

    According to the World Intellectual Property Organization, the new database connects the owners of new technologies with individuals or companies seeking to commercialize or otherwise disseminate green technologies, with the aim of accelerating the innovation and dissemination of green technologies and promoting the response of developing countries climate change.

     

     

     

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