International Court of Justice ICJ Organization Functions Authority Operation and Jurisdiction


Organization Functions Authority Operation and Jurisdiction of International Court of Justice, ICJ FAQs

Meaning of ICJ: The International Court of Justice, also known as ICJ, is the judicial ruling body of the United Nations and was established in February 1946 in accordance with the Statute of the International Court of Justice. The site is in the Peace Palace in The Hague, the Netherlands, also known as "The Hague International Tribunal". The main function of the International Court of Justice is to arbitrate cases submitted by various countries, or to provide advisory judicial advice at the request of the UN General Assembly and the UN Security Council. It can also hear cases of alleged violation of international law.
 

     

    1. What is International Court of Justice?

    Introduction to ICJ: The International Court of Justice is located in the Peace Palace in The Hague, the Netherlands. It began operations in 1946 and has a dual function. It can resolve legal disputes submitted by countries in accordance with international law and issue advisory opinions on legal issues submitted by properly authorized international organizations and agencies. 

    Also known as the "World Court" and "The Hague Court" are the main judicial organs of the United Nations. 

    The court is located in The Hague, but the court ’s trial may be conducted elsewhere according to the needs of the case. 

    All UN member states are participating countries in the Statute of the International Court of Justice. 

    Non-United Nations Member States may also participate as statute participants after being recommended by the UN Security Council and having obtained the approval of the General Assembly. 

    The official languages ​​of the International Court of Justice are French and English.

    The United Nations General Assembly and the Security Council elected the judges of the International Court of Justice on February 6, 1946. 

    The court held its first meeting on April 3 and was formally established in The Hague. Work in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations, the Statute of the International Court of Justice and the Rules of the International Court of Justice (effective from July 1, 1978).

    The Statute of the International Court of Justice is an integral part of the Charter of the United Nations, and all United Nations Member States are of course participants in the Statute. 

    Non-United Nations Member States may also be participants in the Statute after being recommended by the Security Council and approved by the General Assembly.

    Since its establishment, the International Court of Justice has issued 121 judgments. 

    The disputes challenged in ICJ involved:

    • Land borders
    • Maritime delimitation
    • Territorial sovereignty
    • The prohibition of the use of force
    • International humanitarian law
    • The prohibition of interference in other countries' internal affairs
    • Diplomatic relations
    • Hostage incidents
    • Asylum rights
    • Issues of nationality, guardianship, right of passage and economic rights have been issued. 
    • 27 consultation opinions have been issued.


    The International Court of Justice is composed of 15 judges. The term of the judges is nine years. They are elected by the UN General Assembly and the Security Council.
    Seal of the International Court of Justice

    2. What is the International Court of Justice Organization?

    Organization of ICJ: The International Court of Justice is composed of 15 judges of different nationalities elected by the United Nations General Assembly and the United Nations Security Council, including one president for each court. 

    The 15 judges must all come from different countries (the five permanent members of the Security Council, the United States, Britain, China, France and Russia must each occupy a quota). 

    Judges should be able to represent the world’s major cultures and major legal systems as much as possible, and no two of them should be of the same nationality. 

    The judge does not represent any country. Their term of office is 9 years, replacing one third every 3 years. The elected judge shall have the qualification to hold the highest judicial office in the country or the recognized authority of international law.

    Dean's term of office is 3 years. Both the judge and the president can be re-elected and enjoy diplomatic privileges, diplomatic immunity and related facilities during their tenure. 

    The judges are nominated by domestic groups composed of arbitrators of the permanent arbitration courts or groups appointed by governments specifically for the election of the International Court of Justice, and elected by the UN General Assembly and the UN Security Council.

    Judges are appointed for a term of 9 years and are eligible for re-election. A third of the judges are elected every three years. All decisions must be made after the majority of the judges present agree.

    The International Court of Justice elected Slovak Judge Peter Tomka and Mexican Judge Bernardo Sepúlveda-Amor as President and Vice President of the International Court of Justice on February 6, 2012 For a three-year term.

    The main organs of the International Court of Justice are the Summary Procedure Chamber, the Budget and Administration Committee, the Relations Committee, the Library Committee, the Revision of the Statute Committee of the International Court of Justice, and the International Maritime Court.

    International Court of Justice at Hague

    3. What are the main functions of International Court of Justice?

    ICJ Main Functions: The main function of the International Court of Justice is to make judgments on legal disputes submitted by various countries in accordance with the provisions of the Charter of the United Nations and relevant treaties and conventions, or to provide advisory opinions on legal issues raised by other UN agencies. 

    The International Court of Justice is a civil court that only accepts disputes between sovereign states. It has no criminal jurisdiction and cannot try individuals, such as war criminals. 

    According to the relevant regulations, the International Court of Justice can make a ruling only if the parties concerned unanimously agree to submit a legal dispute to the International Court of Justice. Resolve legal disputes submitted to it by countries, and provide advice on legal issues submitted by UN agencies.

    The International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea, located in Hamburg, Germany, is an independent judiciary established under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, designed to adjudicate disputes arising from the interpretation or implementation of the Convention. 

    The jurisdiction of the court includes all disputes submitted to the court in accordance with the Convention and its Implementation Agreement, as well as all matters specified in any other agreement conferring jurisdiction on the court.

    4. What is the Main Authority of International Court of Justice?

    Main Authority of ICJ: The International Court of Justice has two powers, namely, jurisdiction for litigation and advisory jurisdiction.

    What is the Litigation Jurisdiction of International Court of Justice?

    ICJ Jurisdiction: Refers to the jurisdiction of the lawsuit submitted to the court. As far as the jurisdiction of litigation is concerned, only countries can refer cases of disputes between them to the International Court of Justice for determination. 

    It does not accept litigation from non-states, even an intergovernmental international organization, nor does it accept individual litigation. 

    There are three types of countries litigating to the International Court of Justice: the first type is a Member State of the United Nations. 

    The second type is a Member State that is not a member of the United Nations, but it is a party to the Statute of the International Court of Justice. Then, after a dispute with another country, a country is willing to refer the dispute between them to the International Court of Justice in accordance with the provisions of the Charter of the United Nations. The court also has jurisdiction over this.

    What is the Advisory Jurisdiction of International Court of Justice?

    ICJ Advisory Jurisdiction: Advisory jurisdiction and litigation jurisdiction are different.

    In the jurisdiction of litigation, as soon as the court makes a judgment, the judgment is binding on the law of the State Party concerned, and the State Party in dispute is obliged to accept the filed judgment unless it has a valid reason to request the court to approve the review. But whether it is reviewed or not, as long as it accepts the court s jurisdiction, the court ’s judgment must be enforced, and the judgment of the International Court of Justice is final. 

    If the country ’s failure to fulfill the judgment jeopardizes world peace and security, then the UN Security Council has the right to intervene . The advisory jurisdiction obviously does not have such legal binding force.

    5. What are the Court Operations of International Court of Justice?

    Court Operations of ICJ:

    Committees

    During the reporting period, the two committees established by the Court to facilitate its administrative work held several meetings; as of July 31, 2010, the composition of these committees was as follows:

    (A) Budget and Administrative Committee:

    • President Owada (Chairman)
    • Vice President Tomka and Judge Keith, Sepúlveda-Amor Bennouna
    • Yusuf
    • Greenwood


    (B) Library Committee:

    • Judge Birgenthal (Chairman) and Judges Simma
    • Abraham
    • Bennouna
    • Cancado Trindade


    The Rules Committee is a permanent body established by the Court in 1979 and is composed of Judges Hasunai (Chairman) and Abraham, Keith, Skotnikov, Cancado Trindade, and Greenwood.

    Registry

    The Court is the only major organ of the United Nations with its own administrative department (see Article 98 of the Charter). 
    The Registry is the permanent administrative organ of the court. 

    The Statute and the Rules (especially Articles 22 to 29 of the Rules) define the duties of the Office. 

    Since the court is both a judicial institution and an international institution, the Registry’s role is to provide judicial support while operating as an international secretariat. 

    The organization of the Registry is prescribed by the court based on the recommendations made by the Registrar, and the duties of the Registry are determined by instructions drafted by the Registrar and approved by the Court.

    The "Instructions for the Registry" was drafted in October 1946. The organizational chart of the Registry is attached to the back of this report.

    Officials of the Registry shall be appointed by the court on the basis of the Registrar’s recommendation; General Service staff shall be appointed by the Registrar after obtaining approval from the President. The short-term staff shall be appointed by the Registrar. Working conditions are stipulated in the Staff Regulations adopted by the court (see Article 28 of the Rules). 

    In general, officials of the Registry enjoy the same privileges and immunities as officials of the same level of diplomatic missions in The Hague. 

    Their status, remuneration and pension rights are the same as those of the Secretariat of the same category or grade.

    In the past 20 years, despite the adoption of new technologies by the Registry, its workload has increased substantially as the number of cases filed with the Court has increased significantly.

    Taking into account the 7 professional posts and two General Service posts newly established in the 2010-2011 biennium budget, and the converted 4 biennial translator posts, there are 114 posts in the Registry in 2012 (one year Formerly 105 posts). 
    There are 58 posts in the Professional category and above (of which 50 are permanent posts and 8 are biennial posts), 56 General Service posts (53 of which are permanent posts and 3 are Two-year post).

    In accordance with the opinions expressed by the General Assembly, the Registry has established a performance appraisal system for its staff from January 1, 2004. 
    The performance appraisal system will be revised soon.

    The Registry is preparing to issue a new “Registrar Staff Regulations” in accordance with the Staff Regulations that entered into force in the Secretariat in July 2009. 

    In addition, because the United Nations has adopted a new internal justice system, the United Nations Administrative Tribunal has been replaced by the United Nations Appeals Tribunal. 

    Since the International Court of Justice had recognized the United Nations Administrative Tribunal in 1998, the International Court of Justice is considering a new exchange of letters between the President and the Secretary Temporary recognition of the new appellate court as the appellate body.

    i. Who are The Registrar and Deputy Registrar in International Court of Justice?

    ICJ Registrar and deputy Registrar: The Registrar is the normal channel for official documents to communicate with the court, and is especially responsible for handling all official documents, notices and document transmissions required by the Statute or Rules. 

    The Registrar shall, among other things, perform the following tasks:
    (a) keep a summary of the case, register and number them in the order in which the Registrar receives the filed lawsuit or request for advice.

    (b) in person or by the Deputy Registrar Delegates attend meetings of the courts and chambers and prepare the records of these meetings.

    (c) Arrange for the provision or verification of translation and interpretation into the official languages ​​of the court (French and English) as required by the court.

     (d) Sign the court’s All judgments, advisory opinions and orders, and minutes of meetings.

    (e) Responsible for the administration of the Registry and the work of departments and divisions, including the management of accounts and finances in accordance with United Nations financial procedures.

    (f) Assist in maintaining the Court ’s external relations, especially Relations with other United Nations organs, other international organizations and countries, as well as the responsibility for providing information about court activities and court publications.

    (g) custody of court seals, court files, and other files entrusted to the court (including the file).

    The Deputy Registrar assists the Registrar in his work, and performs his duties when the Registrar is not in the era. 

    Since 1998, the Deputy Registrar has been granted broader administrative responsibilities, including direct supervision of archives and the Information Technology Division.

    According to the letter exchange mentioned in paragraph 49 above and General Assembly resolution 90 (I), the Registrar and the Deputy Registrar when acting as Registrar shall enjoy the same privileges and immunities as the head of the diplomatic corps in The Hague. They shall enjoy all the privileges, immunities and conveniences obtained by diplomatic missions when traveling to a third country.

    ii. What are the Various practice divisions and units of the Registry?

    Department of Legal Affairs The Department of Legal Affairs has 8 posts in the Professional category and 1 post in the General Service category. 

    Under the direct supervision of the Registrar, it is responsible for handling all legal affairs in the Registry, in particular to assist the courts in performing their judicial functions.

    The registry also serves as the secretariat of the various drafting committees that draft the court ruling, as well as the secretariat of the rules committee. 

    The registry conducts research on international law issues as required and reviews judicial and procedural precedents.
    It also prepares research reports and notes for courts and registrars as required. 

    The Registry also writes all letters in pending cases and more generally diplomatic letters on the application of the Statute or Rules of the Court for the Registrar to issue. 

    This Registry is responsible for monitoring the implementation of the headquarters agreements concluded with the host country. 

    The Registry is also responsible for the preparation of court minutes. Finally, the Ministry provides advice on all legal issues related to the employment conditions of Registry staff.

    Department of Language Affairs

    The Department of Language Affairs currently has 17 posts in the Professional category and 1 post in the General Service category. 
    It is responsible for document translation between the two official languages ​​of the Court and provides language support to judges. 

    The court uses its two official languages ​​equally in all stages of its activities. 

    The translated documents include:

    • The pleadings and other letters of the case of the State party
    • Verbatim records of hearings
    • Drafts of court judgments, advisory opinions and orders, and various working documents
    • Judges’ notes, opinions, and statements attached to the judgments
    • Minutes of meetings of its and its affiliates, including minutes of budget and administrative committees and other committees.
    • Internal reports, notes, research reports, memoranda, and instructions; presidents and judges’ speeches to external agencies, and reports and Letters, etc. 


    The registry also provides interpretation services for private and public meetings of the court and, as required, meetings between the president and judges and agents of the parties and other official visitors.

    Since the Ministry established 12 new posts in 2000, the number of external translators has been greatly reduced. 
    However, due to the increased workload of the courts, the need for temporary help from conferences began to increase. 

    However, the Department makes the best use of translation at home (less costly than requiring freelance translators to work in the Registry) and remote translation (by other language departments within the United Nations system). 

    The court uses external interpreters for hearings and comments. However, in order to reduce expenses and to have greater flexibility when the court timetable changes, and to ensure that the Registry’s various tasks are more effective.

    The cooperative relationship has decided to provide interpreter training to some translators who are willing to receive interpreter training. An English-French translator already has the necessary conditions for professional interpretation.

    News Department in ICJ Ministry

    There are 3 posts in the Professional category and 1 post in the General Service category, which play an important role in the Court’s external relations. 

    The ministry’s responsibilities include:

    • Answering inquiries for court information
    • Preparing all documents containing general court information (especially the court ’s annual report to the General Assembly, the Yearbook and various manuals for the general public)
    • Encouraging 
    • Assist the media to report on the work of the court (especially through the preparation of press releases and the development of new communication aids, especially audiovisual means). 


    The ministry also held briefings to introduce the courts to relevant audiences (diplomatic personnel, lawyers, students and others), and was also responsible for updating the court's website. 
    The ministry's responsibilities also include internal communication.

    The Ministry of Information is also responsible for organizing the court’s open court and all other formal events, especially a large number of visits, including VIP visits. In this case, it assumes the duties of the concierge.

    iii. What are the Various technical divisions in International Court of justice?

    Administration and personnel department

    The Division of Administration and Personnel currently has two posts in the Professional category and 12 posts in the General Service category, responsible for various responsibilities in administration and staff management, including planning and conducting staff recruitment, appointment, promotion, training and separation.

    In terms of staff management, the Division ensures compliance with the Registry Staff Regulations and the United Nations Staff Regulations and Rules as determined by the Court. 

    As part of the recruitment process, the Division prepares vacancy announcements, reviews applications, arranges interviews to select candidates, and draws up contracts for candidates to handle the appointment of new staff. 

    The Division also manages staff entitlements and benefits, handles related personnel actions, and liaises with the Office of Human Resources Management and the United Nations Joint Staff Pension Fund.

    The Department of Administration and Personnel is also responsible for procurement, inventory management, and liaises with the Carnegie Foundation, the owner of the Peace Palace, to handle matters related to buildings. 

    The Division has certain security responsibilities and also oversees the work of the General Assistant Division. 

    The General Assistant Division is headed by a coordinator and provides services such as delivery, transportation, and reception to judges and registry staff.

    Finance Division

    There are 1 post in the Professional category and 2 posts in the General Service category, responsible for financial matters. 

    The duties of the Division include, inter alia: preparing a draft budget, ensuring that the budget is properly implemented, keeping financial accounting books, conducting financial reports, managing payments and salary payments to suppliers, and handling work related to the salary of court judges and Registry staff (Such as various allowances and expense reimbursement). 

    The Finance Division is also responsible for paying pensions for retired judges of the courts, handling treasury and banking matters, and maintaining contact with the taxation authorities of the host country.

    Publishing Division

    The Publishing Division has three posts in the professional category, responsible for the preparation of the manuscript, proofreading, proof correction, valuation and selection of printing companies for the following official publications of the court:
    (a) Collection of judgments, advisory opinions and orders
    (b) Oral debate and documents
    (c) Decrees and documents on the organization of courts
    (d) Bibliography
    (e) Yearbook

    The Division is also responsible for issuing various other publications in accordance with the instructions of the court or the Registrar. 

    In addition, due to the outsourcing of printing operations for court publications, the Division is also responsible for the preparation, signing and execution of contracts with printers, including the handling of all bills.

    Documents Division and Court Library

    The Documents Division has two posts in the Professional category and four posts in the General Service category, whose main tasks are to obtain, preserve, classify and provide major international law works and a large number of journals and other related documents. 

    The Division compiles a catalogue of documents for judges in cases submitted to the court and compiles other catalogues as required. 

    The Division also provides translators with the necessary reference materials. Through its partnership with the United Nations System Electronic Information Procurement Group (UNSEIAC), the Division provides more and more databases and online resources, as well as a rich collection of useful electronic documents for the court. 

    The Division has purchased integrated software to manage the documents it collects and the Division’s business operations. It will soon launch an online catalog for all judges and Registry staff in the court.

    The Division works closely with the Carnegie Foundation and the Peace Palace Library.

    The Division is also responsible for keeping the files of the Nuremberg International Military Tribunal (including paper documents, audio recordings, films and some items). Plans to protect and digitize these archives are being implemented.

    Information Technology Division

    The Information Technology Division has 2 posts in the Professional category and 4 posts in the General Service category, responsible for the efficient operation and continuous development of information technology in the Court. 

    The Division is responsible for the management and operation of the court’s local area network and all other computers and technical equipment, as well as the implementation of new software and hardware projects to assist and train computer users to master all aspects of information technology. 

    Finally, the Division is responsible for the technical development and management of the Court ’s website, and is currently studying a project to modernize the Registry’s telephone facilities in order to achieve significant cost reductions in this regard.

    Archives, Indexing and Distribution Division

    There are 1 post in the Professional category and 5 posts in the General Service category, which are responsible for indexing and sorting all letters and documents sent and received by the Court, which are subsequently retrieved upon request. 

    The duties of the Division include, inter alia, maintaining an up-to-date index of correspondence and all archived official documents and other documents. Also, they are responsible for checking and distributing and filing all internal documents, some of which must be kept strictly confidential. 

    The Division already has a computerized system for managing internal and external documents.

    The Division is also responsible for distributing the Court ’s official publications to Member States of the United Nations and many agencies and individuals.

    Judge's secretary

    The 15 secretaries of the judge are led by a coordinator and take on various duties. 

    Generally speaking, the secretaries are responsible for the writing, amendments and opinions of judges and ad hoc judges and the typing of all correspondence, assisting judges to manage their work logs, preparing relevant documents for meetings, and receiving visitors and answering inquiries.

    Chief Medical Officer

    Since 2009, the Registry has hired a chief medical officer for a quarter of the time, and the salary is paid by the funds granted to temporary staff. 

    The chief medical officer is responsible for emergency and regular medical examinations, conducts the first medical examination of the new staff, and provides advice to the Registry on health and hygiene issues, workbench ergonomics, and working conditions. 

    In addition, the chief medical officer also organizes publicity, screening, prevention and vaccination.

    Staff Committee

    The Registry Staff Committee was established in 1979 and must comply with the provisions of Article 9 of the Registry Staff Regulations. 

    The constitution of the committee was revised in 1991. During the reporting period, the Committee, with the support of the Registrar, re-elected officers, supplemented its founding documents and restored the Staff Brief. 

    During the same period, the Committee resumed its role of promoting dialogue and listening to the concerns expressed by the Registry, and was committed to a constructive partnership with Registry management.

    Seat of court

    The court is located in The Hague, but if the court deems it appropriate, it may hold court and perform its duties elsewhere (Article 22, paragraph 1, of the Statute; Article 55 of the Rules)

    The court uses the premises of the Peace Palace in The Hague. On February 21, 1946, the United Nations and the Carnegie Foundation, which is responsible for the management of the Peace Palace, reached an agreement that determined the conditions for the court to use these premises and provided for annual payments to the Carnegie Foundation. 

    In accordance with the supplementary agreements approved by the General Assembly in 1951 and 1958 and subsequent amendments, the amount of contributions has increased.

     In 2010, the United Nations paid an annual payment of 1,224,093 euros to the Carnegie Foundation.

    Peace Palace Museum

    In 1999, the Secretary-General of the United Nations unveiled the museum that the International Court of Justice opened in the South Building of the Peace Palace. 

    The museum is operated by the Carnegie Foundation and the theme of the show is "Justice for Peace". 

    Plans are currently being made to allow the public to visit the historical exhibits exhibited in the museum: these exhibits will be moved to a new building called the "Visitor Center". 

    The Carnegie Foundation will build and manage the building in front of the Peace Palace from 2011 to 2012. 
    The new visitor center will be able to receive thousands of visitors every year.

    6. What is the Jurisdiction of Internationl Court of Justice?

    ICJ Jurisdiction:

    Litigation

    On July 31, 2009, the 192 Member States of the United Nations were all parties to the Statute of the Court.

    A total of 66 countries have made declarations in accordance with Article 36, paragraphs 2 and 5, of the Statute, recognizing that the court’s jurisdiction is mandatory (many of which have reservations). 
    These countries are:
    Australia
    Austria
    Barbados
    Belgium
    Botswana
    Bulgaria
    Cambodia
    Cameroon
    Canada
    Costa Rica
    Côte d’ Ivoire
    Cyprus
    Democratic Republic of Congo
    Denmark
    Djibouti
    Dominica
    Dominican Republic
    Egypt
    Estonia
    Finland
    Gambia
    Georgia
    Germany
    Greece
    Guinea
    Guinea-Bissau
    Haiti
    Honduras
    Hungary
    India
    Japan
    Kenya
    Lesotho
    Liberia
    Liechtenstein
    Luxembourg
    Madagascar
    Malawi
    Malta
    Mauritius
    Mexico
    Netherlands
    New Zealand
    Niaragua
    Nigeria
    Norway
    Pakistan
    Panama
    Paraguay
    Peru
    Philippines
    Poland
    Portugal
    Senegal
    Slovakia
    Somalia
    Spain
    Sudan
    Suriname
    Swaziland
    Sweden
    Switzerland
    Togo
    Uganda
    United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
    Uruguay

    There are about 300 currently in force multilateral and bilateral conventions that provide courts with jurisdiction.

    Advisory Matters

    In addition to the United Nations agencies (the General Assembly and the Security Council, as well as the Economic and Social Council, the Trusteeship Council, and the General Assembly’s Interim Committee with the power to request the Court’s advisory opinion on “any legal issues”). 

    The following organizations are now authorized For legal issues arising within the court, the court shall issue an advisory opinion:


    Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization


    World Health Organization, WHO

    World Bank



    International Monetary Fund, IMF


    World Meteorological Organization

    International Maritime Organization

    World Intellectual Property Organization




    7. What is the Judge system in International Court of Justice?

    ICJ Judge System:
    The 15 judges of the International Court of Justice are elected, and the term of office is nine years. They are eligible for re-election.

    The Registry of the International Court of Justice is a permanent administrative organ that assists the International Court of Justice in performing its duties.

    The judges of the International Court of Justice are elected by the General Assembly and the Security Council. 

    In the General Assembly, countries that are parties to the Statute of the International Court of Justice but are not members of the United Nations (Switzerland and Nauru) are allowed to participate in elections; in the Security Council, no veto power can be exercised in this election. 

    The two organs vote at the same time but separately. 
    "Note: Elections are generally held in New York in the fall."
    Candidates must obtain an absolute majority of votes in these two agencies to be elected. This usually requires multiple votes.

    To ensure the continuity of the composition of the court to a certain extent, the terms of the 15 judges do not all expire on the same day. Every three years, a third of the judges of the court are elected.

    Judges elected every three years (usually in the fall) took office on February 6, the following day, the day when the first judges of the International Court of Justice took office in 1946.

    If a judge dies or resigns during his term, special elections should be held as soon as possible, and the elected judge then completes the remaining term.

    The Statute of the International Court of Justice stipulates that the Court shall be composed of 15 independent judges, regardless of nationality, and shall be selected from jurists of noble character who have the highest qualifications for appointment in the country or recognized as international law.

    870th Anniversary

    On April 20, 2016, the International Court of Justice, the main judicial organ of the United Nations, solemnly celebrated its 70th anniversary at the Peace Palace in The Hague, The Netherlands. 

    UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon attended the ceremony and delivered a speech, affirming that the International Court of Justice has made active efforts and important contributions to the peaceful settlement of international disputes over the course of 70 years.

    Ban Ki-moon said: "As the main judicial organ of the United Nations, in the past 70 years, the International Court of Justice has helped countries resolve disputes through peaceful means and played a central role in promoting the rule of law in the international community." Adjudicate, abide by the promises, and resolve disputes peacefully.

    Ambassador Liu Jieyi, the rotating chairman of the UN Security Council for some months is the Permanent Representative of China to the UN, sent congratulatory messages for the celebration. 

    Liu Jieyi said in his congratulatory message that the International Court of Justice plays an indispensable role in achieving the purpose of maintaining peace and security of the United Nations. 

    The world today is undergoing rapid and profound changes. The entire international community is looking forward to the fair justice of the International Court of Justice and the guarantee of international peace and security according to law.

    Liu Jieyi said that the international community should continue to promote the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations, firmly adhere to multilateralism, seek collective solutions to problems facing each other, promote the exchange of civilizations, strive for harmony and diversity, and achieve equitable, fair and just, Jointly build a shared security pattern, seek open and innovative, inclusive and mutually beneficial development prospects, and build a win-win international relationship and a community of human destiny.

    King William-Alexander of the Netherlands, representatives of the Dutch government, representatives of international institutions based in The Hague and some diplomatic envoys in the Netherlands attended the ceremony.

    9. What is the Statement of International Court of Justice for not participating in the South China Sea arbitration?

    ICJ Statement not to participate in the South China Sea arbitration:
    On July 14, 2016, the International Court of Justice issued a reminder message on the homepage of its website, stating that the result of the South China Sea arbitration award was made by a special arbitration tribunal under the permanent arbitration court. The International Court of Justice, as a completely different body, did not participate in the case from beginning to end.

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